Weill Cornell Medicine Urology
Weill Cornell Medicine Urology
Ejaculatory Dysfunction - Symptoms & Evaluation

Ejaculatory Dysfunction - Symptoms & Evaluation

A comprehensive medical and sexual history is the most important aspect in the diagnosis of men with ejaculatory dysfunction. A focused genital exam is also indicated in most circumstances. Testosterone is often the most commonly performed blood test in the evaluation of ejaculatory dysfunction.

Premature ejaculation (PE), also known as rapid ejaculation, lacks a definition that is agreed upon by all practitioners, but essentially is the condition whereby a patient ejaculates with minimal sexual stimulation and before he wishes it to occur.

Premature ejaculation is currently defined by the International Society of Sexual Medicine as a lifelong history of ejaculation occurring within less than one minute of penetration (lifelong PE), or a clinically significant and bothersome reduction in latency time, often to about three minutes or less (acquired PE). Patients will also have reduced or absent ejaculatory control. Premature ejaculation often causes negative personal consequences, such as distress, bother, frustration, and/or the avoidance of sexual intimacy.

Patients with retrograde ejaculation will have a normal sensation of orgasm and climax but will have little to no anterograde (forward) propulsion of semen. This is often referred to as a dry orgasm. This process is diagnosed by the finding of seminal fluid and/or sperm within a urine specimen obtained immediately after orgasm.

Delayed ejaculation or anorgasmia involves the inability of the patient to achieve orgasm (ejaculation) in a timely manner, and in severe cases, involves failure to achieve orgasm on any occasion. As men age, there is an increase in the time it takes to achieve ejaculation. However, in some men, this increase may lead to the inability to ejaculate within a 30-minute time period from the initiation of sexual stimulation.

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Physicians & Faculty

Dr. Peter N. Schlegel, MD, FACS | Cornell Urology

Peter N. Schlegel

M.D., F.A.C.S.

212.746.5491
212.746.5491
Aetna-Weill Cornell POS, Medicaid, Medicare, Rockefeller University-CoreSource
The LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery
Dr. Marc Goldstein, M.D., F.A.C.S. | Weill Cornell Medicine

Marc Goldstein

M.D., F.A.C.S.

212.746.5470
212.746.5470
Aetna-Weill Cornell POS, Medicaid, Medicare, Rockefeller University-CoreSource
Brady Urologic Health Center
Dr.  Darius Paduch, M.D., Ph.D.

Darius A. Paduch

M.D., Ph.D.

212.746.5309
212.746.5309
AETNA-HMO, AETNA-PPO, Aetna-Weill Cornell POS, EBCBS PPO/EPO, Medicaid, Rockefeller University-CoreSource
The LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery
Dr. James A. Kashanian, M.D.

James A. Kashanian

M.D.

212.746.5309
212.746.5309
AETNA [Medicare], AETNA-HMO, AETNA-PPO, Aetna-Weill Cornell POS, Affinity Access, Affinity Essential, Affinity Health Plan, Blue Priority Network, CIGNA, EBCBS HMO, EBCBS Mediblue, EBCBS Pathway X, EBCBS Pathway X Enhanced, EBCBS PPO/EPO, Emblem Select Care, Empire BCBS HealthPlus, Empire BCBS HealthPlus (CHP), Fidelis Care, GHI, Health First, Health Insurance Plan of NY (HIP), Health Insurance Plan of NY (HIP) [Medicaid], Health Insurance Plan of NY (HIP) [Medicare], Medicaid, Medicare, Oxford Freedom, Oxford Health Plans [Liberty], Oxford Health Plans [Medicare], Oxford Health Plans [Metro/Core/Charter], Rockefeller University-CoreSource, UHC Community Plan - Essential Plan, UHC Community Plan - Medicaid Plan, UHC Compass, UHC Compass-HMO, UHC Medicare, United Empire Plan, United Healthcare Commercial, VNSNY CHOICE Medicare, VNSNY CHOICE SelectHealth
The LeFrak Center for Robotic Surgery

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