Weill Cornell Medicine Urology
Weill Cornell Medicine Urology
Kidney Stones

Kidney Stones

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Kidney stones are small, hard mineral deposits that form inside the collecting system of the kidneys.

Weill Cornell Medicine Urology – Lower Manhattan

Appointments: (646) 962-9600

For word-class and compassionate urologic care in downtown Manhattan, Weill Cornell Medicine and Brady Urologic Associates has a clinical urology practice at 156 William Street and affiliated with New York-Presbyterian Lower Manhattan Hospital. This practice is housed in a newly renovated clinical space, equipped with state-of-the-art medical technologies, exam rooms, and procedure rooms.

Kari White

Kari White, NP Graduated from Columbia University School of Nursing in 2010 with her Nurse Practitioner in Acute Care.  She worked in Pain Management and primary health until 2013 when she started working at St. Barnabus Hospital as a Urological Nurse Practitioner. NP White worked in both in/outpatient and surgery. She became a part of the Weill Cornell Medicine family in 2015 where her primary focus has been on general urological outpatient etiologies. 

Scott G. David

Dr. Scott David joined the Department of Urology faculty full-time as of August 1, 2010 and serves as an Assistant Attending physician at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center. He has a full-time practice on campus and is able to see all of his patients at this location, allowing him to easily transition from the operating room to office consultation.

Joseph J. Del Pizzo

Joseph J. Del Pizzo, M.D. is the E. Darracott Vaughan Jr., Professor of Urology and the Board Certified Director of Laparoscopic and Robotic Surgery for the Department of Urology at Weill Cornell Medicine. He joined the surgical staff at The New York Presbyterian Hospital in 2000 after serving as a clinical fellow in Laparoscopy and Minimally Invasive Urology.

Kidney Stones

Kidney stones affect up to 5% of the population, with a lifetime risk of passing a kidney stone at about 8-10%. While more common in warmer southern states, they are a frequent reason for patients to seek urologic care in the northeast. Stones form twice as often in men as women. The peak age in men is 30 years; women have a bimodal age distribution, with peaks at 35 and 55 years. Once a kidney stone forms, the probability that a second stone will form within five to seven years is approximately 50%.

Kidney Stones - Treatment Options

Treatment of your kidney stone depends on several factors that are specific to your case, such as:

Brady Urologic Health Center

The Brady Urologic Health Center is located within an 8,000 square foot suite on the ninth floor of the Starr Pavilion at Weill Cornell Medicine/New York-Presbyterian Hospital and is composed of a close-knit team of physicians, working together to provide treatment for the broad spectrum of urologic conditions.

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